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October 19-23

War of the Worlds

https://www.everymanplayhouse.com/whats-on/the-war-of-the-worlds


Reviewed for North West End: www.northwestend.co.uk

 

4*

What a tangled web we weave, especially these days when the Internet ensures all kinds of information reach the parts that other sources can’t get to. Fake news can make people belligerent or else scare them out of their wits, just as it did with the broadcast of ‘War of the Worlds’ years ago. Read the rest of this entry »

October 12-16

Dracula: The Untold Story
imitating the dog and Leeds Playhouse

Adapted and directed by Andrew Quick and Pete Brooks


https://www.everymanplayhouse.com/whats-on/dracula-the-untold-story

 

Reviewed for North West End: www.northwestend.co.uk

3*

The road to Hell is paved with good intentions, and here we are on Route 66 (or should that be 666?), since that’s their year (read on…), and a young lady has just walked into a police station to confess to murder. But she says her name is Mina Harker…

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July 17- August 30

Pride And Prejudice

Grosvenor Park Open Air Theatre

https://www.grosvenorparkopenairtheatre.co.uk/

Reviewed for Writebase: https://writebase.co.uk/

 

4*

It is a truth universally acknowledged – that you absolutely do not need to open with such a well known quote, or variations thereof, even if it establishes that most people know what you are talking about, and a plot summary is not required. Nor that such a familiar tale couldn’t prove damn’d tricky to be given enough of a spin to sprinkle it with stardust and make it fresh and original. It succeeds wonderfully.

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August 19-30

Jungle Book

Grosvenor Park Open Air Theatre

https://www.grosvenorparkopenairtheatre.co.uk/

Reviewed for Writebase: https://writebase.co.uk/

 

 

3*

They say the sun shines on the righteous, so here, only right that the forecast of rain was incorrect – though it became a biblical outpouring almost as soon as this swinging performance finished. Read the rest of this entry »

Orbis 198, Winter

Fancy a closer look?

And get to know us better: a whole year’s worth as pdfs (OS, £20)
+ 1 back copy of the actual magazine: £12 (UK; inc p+p)

Because reading magazines helps judge the best match with your work
in order to maximize publication opportunities.

 

****

Few magazines are able to offer payment or feedback, but Orbis helps alleviate suffering for Arts’ sake: Readers’ Award: £50; plus £50 between 4 runners-up
Editor Carole Baldock has also provided proofs with editorial suggestions for every contributor for the past 20 years…

Available for readings and workshops: The A to Y of Getting into Print

Anything at Any level to help Your success:

magazines; collections/books; competitions etc

Everyone said they’d come again which is, of course, the best feedback

(Cheshire County Council workshop)

****

Mentoring and Critique Service

Your editorial expertise was invaluable for improving my work (New York)

Wow – I thought it was finished. You made it so much better (New Zealand)

 

****

 

Information is posted at regular intervals,
regardless of what the date counter says
(because I keep forgetting to update it), unless –

I’m too busy grumbling about ads which feature mothers
uttering the most stupid comments…

****

Subs: £19/4 pa. Single issue: £5.50, all including p+p

Overseas:  £42/€50/$60. Single issue: £11.50/€14/$16

NB, cheques payable to me

Paypal: please use Contact Form or post request for email address 

Also, via LinkedIn or Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/53636000056/?ref=br_tf&epa=SEARCH_BOX

 

198


Orbis
198, Winter 2021

Editor: Carole Baldock
Associate Editor (Book Reviews) Maria Isakova Bennett

£5.50 (Overseas: £11.50/€14/$16); Subs: £19/4 pa (Overseas: £42/€50/$60)

Front cover artwork: ‘Time and Place‘ by Peter Raymond
(from an idea by Carole Baldock)

back cover, detail from image: www.prphoto.co.uk

‘Tis the season to be…
keeping your fingers crossed yet again
in the hope of Yuletide celebrations going to plan.
But whether commiserations or congratulations, you can immerse
yourself in this festive feast, soaring high with Maureen Jivani at Two Minutes
to 13
, never worrying about The Weight of Light (KB Ballentine)
or Richard Lister and his Riddle from the sands, while making the most of
Beth Booth’s Swooping Season. As for Xxxx shopping, an apology from
David LukensWhy I can’t tell you the way to Tescobut not a problem
because, 
At the end of the day (Kathryn MacDonald), you could easily
pick up something colourful in Ceruleanlike Luke Morgan or
an absolute bargain at 
Helen Overell’s Point of sale in the Charity Shop,
and enjoy a tale about Gretel and the woodcutter from Simon Leonard.
In fact,
 there’s sure to be something in this issue for everybody to enjoy

Featured Poet
Pauline Hall
: The Affair; Pleasures; Getting away; Collisions ; Panache

Poems from:
Adrian Buckner (Adjective on the town); Miranda Day (The Rock and the Water);
Max Roland Ekstrom (My Maternity) Matt Haw (Gloomers);
Luke Morgan (Cerulean); Mary Mulholland (Playing with snakes);
Pete Mullineaux (‘Don’t always expect fireworks…’); 
Sara Truuvert
(Will My Iguana Love Me?)


Prose from: James Brasfield (The Carpathian Connection);
Philip Dunkerley (The Godsend);Jean Maskell (At the crossroads)

Translation: Niels hav (Sker det at nogen siger fra?)


Past Master: Susan Wismer on Tekahionwake: E. Pauline Johnson


Reviews by
David Harmer, D. A. Prince, Pauline Rowe, Theresa Sowerby and Andrew Taylor

 

Orbis 198 contributors also include
Michael Bartholomew-Biggs; David Burridge; RC deWinter;
Massimo Fantuzzi; George Freek; Victoria Gatehouse; Doreen Hinchliffe;
Sue Kauth;
Alicia Byrne Keane; Jennie Owen; Frances Sackett; Penny Sharman;
Matt Smith; Peter Sutton; Sarah Wimbush; Mantz Yorke

 

 

 



Orbis194.pmd

January 26
Ó Bhéal Five Words Competition

Weekly closing date each Tuesday at noon
Must feature the five words given for the week

www.obheal.ie/blog/five-words-poetry-competition

 

DawnK6A8332_col

 

Write your way out of it with Dawn Gorman

Please email me
for details of this, and/or
my full critiquing service:

dawn@dawngorman.co.uk      www.dawngorman.co.uk

 

Read the rest of this entry »

FrenchWF220-48

French House Party
Creative Writing Course,
Carcassonne, Southern France

Monday, 28 September
to Saturday, 3 October

www.frenchhouseparty.eu

Read the rest of this entry »

February 8-March 14

The Suicide

Chester Storyhouse
https://www.storyhouse.com/

Reviewed for Writebase: https://writebase.co.uk/

4*

Billed as a comedy, actually a farce, and with a title like that – what could possibly go wrong? And considering drama is expected to be based on conflict, it opens with Simon expostulating with his spouse, Marie (over sausage rolls…), bickering with bossy Sarah, his mother-in-law, and

lambasting his unscrupulous landlord, Alexander. No guesses here why the leading man is heading for being described as late. He’s lost his job and his money and they are reduced to living in a hovel, lovingly, if you’ll excuse the word, evoked (likewise) by a scruffy bedroom, background full of piled up cardboard boxes, flanked by rickety door and window, with a staircase leading up to the dodgy toilet.

The stage is set, the wheels are in motion – as are the cogs in Alexander’s brain as he grasps at the means of making a quick buck. Although he has no wish for his reputation to be blighted by a death on his premises, what if he, and others, apart from Marie and Sarah of course, could benefit from Simon’s demise? And there’s the smoking gun…

In fast succession, and even faster costume changes, the unfortunate man receives a series of callers, each of them hinting, or even insisting, that when putting an end to himself, it should be the start of something glorious: he must kill himself for a cause, whether political, financial or religious. Not forgetting, and how on earth could we in this day and age, a reality show and social media. And my word, do the supporting characters come into their own in a myriad of roles, rewriting and breathing life into virtually every stereotype, from  Phillip Laing, gamely glad in a onesie as ‘Man in toilet’ to Sophie Robinson, equally stunning as cynical Father MacAnally and airhead influencer Melody; can’t wait to see her again tackling another role, especially as this type of character is featured more and more often on TV shows, and invariably a daffy blonde when it takes considerable brains to be IT savvy, and the rest. That includes Emma Lau, smart as mediaperson,Florence Moon, then dread-locked Seren, so politically correct and environmental and gender etc aware, it’s a wonder she dare move or speak at all. And just about crowning them all, Camille Mallet de Chauny, as splendid as his name, sweet as the kind-hearted Freddy la Bouff, Alexander’s definitely better half, sour as steely entrepreneur, Jimmy Wood, who adopts a variety of persona in a determined effort to persuade Simon to get on with it.

Thus the main protagonists have a job on their hands to avoid being eclipsed but manage just fine. Corrupt, conniving Alexander (Tim Frances) makes a plausible villain of the piece while Tom Davey manages to retain our sympathy as the hapless, hopeless hero, constantly dithering, and partnered by his lovely, long suffering wife, Natasha Bain. As for Sarah, played here by Nicola Blackman, another jewel, right up there in the Comedy department, winning over the audience every time with acerbic comments and wisecracks.

Comedy, expertly done, and here as much physical theatre and props as dialogue and running jokes, brings serious issues to the fore to be considered in a whole new light. A packed audience enjoyed an excellent evening’s entertainment, with some special effects which I’ll leave for a nice surprise. It makes you curious to discover more about the source material, a play written by the Russian, Nikolai Erdman, always a good thing, and also means you can’t wait to watch the next plays coming to this theatre near you – and certainly well worth travelling some distance to see too.

February 20-March 13

Miss Julie

Chester Storyhouse

https://www.storyhouse.com/

Reviewed for Writebase: https://writebase.co.uk/

3*

What is it with some of these Nordic leading ladies? I hesitate to call them heroines, and besides, the lady here is doing a lot of leading… on. But this is a fascinating adaptation, what you could call an inspired move, from 19th century Sweden and Midsummer Eve to Chinese New Year in 1940s

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